artisticaction:

Dear tumblr folks

My name is Ryan (they/them/their) and I am a queer, Indigenous artist. I am Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe and an aspiring artist and fashion photographer. I am currently fundraising so I will have the opportunity to attend the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe in the fall. 

Finances have been the biggest struggle so far. a lot of my money went to an institution that was neither culturally competent or supportive towards my needs as a native artist. A lot of my work was misidentified with the wrong cultures, I was told I should include more “headdresses” in my work. So I need to go to IAIA because it will give me the education I crave, need, deserve, and clearly earned through 3 years of struggling at another university that could not and did not provide the tools for me to succeed. 

This is a space that is focused on the art i want to bring and will allow me the opportunities and the work spaces to grow and become a better artist. 

Please consider donating and help this 2 spirit individual successfully travel to and occupy a space that was created for me and will provide the necessary support. 

All funding will go to cover transportation.

Links:

GoFundMe page: here.

Facebook Photography page to see more of my work: http://www.facebook.com/RMYoungPhotography 

My project “Indigeneity” was also featured in Native Max Magazine!

http://jaezbrainlint.tumblr.com/post/72434829809#notes

Finally, a link to the Indigeneity Project: http://indigeneityproject.wordpress.com/

Anything you can donate would be amazing <3 If you aren’t able to donate, please help signal boost this post by reblogging it to your page! 

Chi Miigwetch

marvelousmission:

You can find the article Jesse is talking about here.

wrgmag:

image


Ottawa Native American DJ group set out to carve a place for First Nations culture in today’s dance scene and cultural landscape.
That’s the thinking behind what you are about to read, an interview too good to cut down with a group known simply as A Tribe Called Red.

Made up…

theimpossiblecool:

Robin. 
nativeamericannews:

Music Festival Is Banning Cultural Appropriation, aka Hipsters Wearing Native American Headdresses
We’ve all seen the pics. Concertgoers donning high-waisted denim shorts and bro tanks always seeming to piss people off and start some controversy. Recently it’s because they’re wearing Native American headdresses, war paint and feathers.

nativeamericannews:

Music Festival Is Banning Cultural Appropriation, aka Hipsters Wearing Native American Headdresses

We’ve all seen the pics. Concertgoers donning high-waisted denim shorts and bro tanks always seeming to piss people off and start some controversy. Recently it’s because they’re wearing Native American headdresses, war paint and feathers.

berlinsthinker:

#kushandwisdom #quotelounge #love #hate #younowmayfuckoff

berlinsthinker:

#kushandwisdom #quotelounge #love #hate #younowmayfuckoff

ninjaglee:

See how powerful love can be.

ninjaglee:

See how powerful love can be.

nativeamericannews:

#SmokeSignals - Who used it and What was it for? http://bit.ly/UvwbZd

nativeamericannews:

#SmokeSignals - Who used it and What was it for? http://bit.ly/UvwbZd

When I go to contemporary Asian restaurants, like Wolfgang Puck’s now-shuttered 20.21 in Minneapolis and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market in New York City, it seems the entrées are always in the $16–$35 range and the only identifiable person of color in the kitchen is the dishwasher. The menus usually include little blurbs about how the chefs used to backpack in the steaming jungles of the Far East (undoubtedly stuffing all the herbs and spices they could fit into said backpacks along the way, for research purposes), and were so inspired by the smiling faces of the very generous natives—of which there are plenty of tasteful black-and-white photos on the walls, by the way—and the hospitality, oh, the hospitality, that they decided the best way to really crystallize that life-changing experience was to go back home and sterilize the cuisine they experienced by putting some microcilantro on that $20 curry to really make it worthy of the everyday American sophisticate. American chefs like to talk fancy talk about “elevating” or “refining” third-world cuisines, a rhetoric that brings to mind the mission civilisatrice that Europe took on to justify violent takeovers of those same cuisines’ countries of origin. In their publicity materials, Spice Market uses explicitly objectifying language to describe the culture they’re appropriating: “A timeless paean to Southeast Asian sensuality, Spice Market titillates Manhattan’s Meatpacking District with Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s piquant elevations of the region’s street cuisine.” The positioning of Western aesthetics as superior, or higher, than all the rest is, at its bottom line, an expression of the idea that no culture has value unless it has been “improved” by the Western Midas touch. If a dish hasn’t been eaten or reimagined by a white person, does it really exist?